Friday Five – Volume 103

Friday Five-Mere Observations

— 1 —

In my last post of 2015 I talked about learning to read again. And so far it’s going well. The graphic below comes from John Atkinson over at Wrong Hands. I encourage you to check out his stuff.

abridged-classics 1-2016

— 2 —

My quote o’ the week comes from Cardinal John Henry Newman:

Such is the rule of our warfare. We advance by yielding; we rise by falling; we conquer by suffering; we persuade by silence; we become rich by [abundant giving]; we inherit the earth through meekness…. Heaven and earth shall sooner fall than this rule be reversed; it is the law of Christ’s kingdom, and nothing can reverse it but sin.

— 3 —

Last fall I’d written about “Into The Breach” by Bishop Olmsted. It was an amazing document in its clarity and I encourage everyone to read it if you haven’t yet. This week the Diocese of Phoenix followed up Bishop Olmsted’s document with this terrific video:

Read more about it over at One Mad Mom. Here’s a teaser:

So many say, “We should be focusing on the poor and homeless!”, or “We should be focusing on drugs!”, or “Let’s stop human trafficking!”, but quite frankly, we need kill these ills at the root.  Pruning the bush does nothing.  The crud just grows right back.  Can we just stop banging our heads against the wall and admit where the real problem lies?  It’s the complete and utter destruction of the family.

Who’s to blame?  Pretty much most of society played a role at one point or another.  As a society, the Faith went bye-bye.  Feminists hurled the word “mysoginist” around like a verbal tick.  Men were relegated to their corners, afraid to open their mouths.  Masculinity went out the window for many men and grew in women.  The sexes were pitted against each other instead of working together.  We wonder why young men of the West are being sucked in by the radical, Islamic element?  They have a natural desire to being manly, and all they can find is this horribly disfigured version of it, because their own fathers are gone, on drugs, too busy with porn, completely emasculated, society tries to shame masculinity, etc., etc., etc.

— 4 —

In November I decided to pick up a copy of Magnificat’s Year of Mercy Companion and have enjoyed each day’s reading/prayer/meditation on the subject of mercy. Yesterday Anthony Esolen wrote about faithfulness and mercy in the face of ingratitude and included these words from Shakespeare’s As You Like It:

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,
Thou art not so unkind
As man’s ingratitude.

Compared with the repayments of man, even the stiff wind of God’s winter are kind.

— 5 —

Epiphany is over so last night I finished taking down our tree. I hope everyone had a blessed Advent, a Merry Christmas and a terrific New Year. Today I celebrate being a father for twenty years. While in my opinion one should spend more time as a father than as a dad, when you add up the time spent being a “dad” as opposed to “father” I pray that both totals are close to equal on my balance sheet.

Tipped too far towards being a father and not a dad: detached disciplinarian.

Too far in the other direction: a buddy/friend/pal with no discipline.

It ain’t easy to reach that delicate balance, but it’s worth every minute.

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2 thoughts on “Friday Five – Volume 103

  1. How sad, that you opted tobroadcast the screed by One Mad Mom, amidst all those statements about the life of faith. Invariably, finding someone to blame turns us away from the problem. I trust you don’t actually believe that routinely accusing others of misogyny (or of anything else, apart, perhaps, from decrying someone’s worthlessness) has ever fostered evil. And is misogyny a myth — like, perhaps, other forms of prejudice? In the good ol’ days, when my nation’s county seats were named for and mostly run by “good ol’ boys,” wives would fault themselves for “goading” their husbands into beating them. Indeed, most married gals counted themselves lucky if Hubby only hit them once a week or so. Such family values need to stay in the past. I shudder to think how we all would be if that misogynist’s views on male “strength” went mainstream. (Of course, a woman can be misogynist — just as she can abuse her child or partner; or maybe she grew up to be a hedge-fund CEO, a commando, a Nobel Prize-winning doctor, an astronaut, or a lion tamer.) Today as always, our world’s problems spring from a dearth of compassion and truthfulness, rather than from any one behavior or mindset. And interrupting a cycle of wrongdoing will always shift attitudes and expectations, however incrementally change may emerge. Please, folks: let’s keep our focus where it belongs — on mutual respect and vigilance. And if someone would consider reintroducing Rhetoric into the public school curriculum, so much the better.

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    • Thank you for your comment. But I’ve seen this template used before many times:

      How sad [always starting with a commentary on emotion: usually “sad”, “shameful”, “hurtful”, etc.], that you opted to broadcast the screed [or rant? Both defined as something that touched a nerve with the person writing the response] by One Mad Mom, amidst all those statements about the life of faith [attempt to shame the original blogger by in effect saying “how could you possibly put what you did amongst all these other wonderful things that I’m going to now ignore in order to bring attention to the one thing that has pissed me off?”]. Invariably, finding someone to blame turns us away from the problem [I’m surprised you didn’t give a rundown on the history of scapegoating].

      I trust you don’t actually believe that routinely accusing others of misogyny (or of anything else, apart, perhaps, from decrying someone’s worthlessness) has ever fostered evil. And is misogyny a myth — like, perhaps, other forms of prejudice? In the good ol’ days, when my nation’s county seats were named for and mostly run by “good ol’ boys,” wives would fault themselves for “goading” their husbands into beating them. Indeed, most married gals counted themselves lucky if Hubby only hit them once a week or so. Such family values need to stay in the past. I shudder to think how we all would be if that misogynist’s views on male “strength” went mainstream. (Of course, a woman can be misogynist — just as she can abuse her child or partner; or maybe she grew up to be a hedge-fund CEO, a commando, a Nobel Prize-winning doctor, an astronaut, or a lion tamer.)

      [How sad that you decided to include such an incoherent and disjointed rant in the middle of your comment (see what I did there?). While I do not personally know OMM I’ve found nothing in her posts to indicate that she is in favor of misogyny in any way. Nor am I. Your paragraph seems to exist for the purpose of setting up several strawmen in order to accuse OMM of stating that misogyny does not exist. You also indicate that a woman who is a hedge-fund CEO, commando, Nobel Prize-winning doctor, astronaut or lion tamer is on par with a misogynist, child- or partner-beating individual. Care to explain your slander of these professions?]

      Today as always, our world’s problems spring from a dearth of compassion and truthfulness, rather than from any one behavior or mindset. And interrupting a cycle of wrongdoing will always shift attitudes and expectations, however incrementally change may emerge. Please, folks: let’s keep our focus where it belongs — on mutual respect and vigilance. And if someone would consider reintroducing Rhetoric into the public school curriculum, so much the better.

      [Look, I appreciate your comment. I just do not appreciate your use of a template I’ve grown weary of seeing everywhere: from Letters to the Editor to comboxes from blogs to YouTube to Facebook. It’s tiresome. You obviously had a nerve struck by the five paragraphs OMM wrote in her original post and/or are against men in general. I’ve read it again today and cannot see where any of the accusations you level against what she or I have said are warranted.]

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